Best Ways to Cook Potatoes


Slideshow: A Spud Lovers Guide to Potato Varieties

      
by BC Farms & Food  -  Permalink
July 16, 2013

Potatoes may be the most economical vegetable you can grow or buy. High in complex carbohydrates, a source of protein and fibre, this long-time comfort food is cholesterol free and has almost no fat of its own.
<b>Red Potatoes – Chieftain, Red Pontiac, Red La Soda? -</b>

Red potatoes have smooth reddish skin and white flesh, and are generally round and waxy, with a firm texture. They have less starch than russets or whites. Good in soups, potato salads, boiled, steamed, sauteed, roasted, and scalloped/au gratin.
<b>Yellow Potatoes – Yukon Gold, Yellow Finn, German Butterball -</b>?

Yellow potatoes have golden flesh and skin, with a buttery flavour. These versatile potatoes are good boiled, mashed, steamed, baked, roasted or French fried. Not as well-suited for shredded dishes, such as gratins.
<b>Blue Potatoes – All Blue, Russian Blue - </b>?

Sought after for their unique colour, blue potatoes have a deep purple flesh and skin. With low moisture and high starch (solids) content, blues are often boiled, steamed, baked, mashed or roasted.
<b>White Potatoes – White Rose, Cascade - </b>?

White potatoes have white flesh and a smooth light skin. Whites have less starch than russets. They are good in soups, boiled, steamed, mashed, roasted, fried, au gratin, scalloped and in potato salads.
<b>Fingerling Potatoes – Russian Banana, French Fingerlings? - </b>

Fingerlings have a distinctive elongated shape with light yellow flesh and smooth skin. Flavourful, waxy and firm textured, these unique potatoes are delicious roasted with herbs. Fingerlings are also good steamed, boiled, baked or in salads.?
<b>Russet Potatoes – Russet Burbank, Century Russet, Russet Norkotah -</b>

?Perhaps the best known of all potatoes, russets are large with brown, netted skin and white flesh. High in starch, russets are the quintessential baking potato. They are also good mashed, roasted or French fried.
Potatoes may be the most economical vegetable you can grow or buy. High in complex carbohydrates, a source of protein and fibre, this long-time comfort food is cholesterol free and has almost no fat of its own.

There’s a reason potatoes have been called one of the five plants that transformed the world. This hearty vegetable, which originated in the South American Andes, has fed hungry populations for over 7,000 years. With the ability to feed four times as many people as an acre of wheat, potatoes spread to Europe and fuelled a population boom in the late 18th century.

In terms of nutrition, potatoes may be the most economical vegetable you can grow or buy. High in complex carbohydrates, a source of protein and fibre, this long-time comfort food is cholesterol free and has almost no fat of its own. A medium spud delivers about 20 mg of vitamin C, and contains potassium, iron, niacin and vitamin B6.

With soil and climate well-suited to growing these tubers, we’re blessed with a range of potato varieties and colours. Russets are the old-time standby for baked potatoes and home fries. But have you tasted the complex, wonderful flavours of fingerling, white, red, yellow, and blue potatoes?

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